Community college plans to invest in geothermal technology

Posted on: June 6th, 2014
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Community college plans to invest in geothermal technology

Community college plans to invest in geothermal technology

Researchers are currently working to determine whether harnessing the earth’s geothermal energy is the right option for Haywood Community College in Clyde, North Carolina. The Packer reported that the North Carolina Department of Agriculture provided the institution with a $50,000 grant to help pay for the project.

The installation is not only intended to reduce the heating and cooling costs associated with running the community college, but also provide valuable research and data to determine the broad implications the technology could bring to the county’s economy. According to the news source, the geothermal heat pump will be installed at the college’s Mountain Research Station, where the college will offer classes to students to better examine the benefits of the investment.

Independent News reported that a stipulation in the grant required that the researchers work with local farmers to determine the feasibility of installing geothermal heating and cooling technology at their farm. The cooling benefits of the sustainable system are thought to provide farmers with the ability to refrigerate produce during the hottest months of the year – without driving up operational costs.

Farmers in the region have voiced complaints about the heat spoiling fruit and vegetables before they are shipped out to local markets. By investing in a geothermal heating and cooling system in storage areas, produce will be kept at an even temperature regulated by the earth. This allows for a storage container to remain cool, without driving up operational costs to an unsustainable level. A geothermal heating and cooling pump is an eco-friendly option for farmers and other landowners to consider. By using the energy of the earth, a structure’s temperature is kept even – never dropping below or rising higher than what is considered temperate.

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